Tyre Pressure Monitoring System (TPMS)

Tyre Pressure Monitoring System (TPMS)

In order to assist you in monitoring the pressure in your tyres, all new cars are now equipped with a tyre pressure monitoring system (TPMS) which notifies you of any pressure issues.

To discover how your TPMS works and how you need to look after it, take a look at our animated video, below.

The air pressure within your tyres is the most important factor in determining how well they perform. Pressure affects the tyre’s speed capability, load carrying capacity, handling response, wear rate and overall safety. What’s more, under-inflated tyres will cause your car to use more fuel and emit more CO2 emissions. It’s therefore critical for your safety and comfort that your tyres are properly inflated in line with the vehicle manufacturers’ recommendations. Tyre pressures should be manually checked when they are cold at least once a month or before a long journey. However, in order to assist you in monitoring the pressure in your tyres, all new cars are now equipped with a tyre pressure monitoring system (TPMS) which notifies you of any pressure issues.

TPMS Warning Lights

warning_lights_grid_665

Never ignore the TPMS warning light on your dashboard as there may be a problem with the pressure in one or more of your tyres.

If the TPMS warning light on your dashboard illuminates, this should not be ignored as there may be a problem with the pressure in one or more of your tyres.

If you see a TPMS warning while driving, find a safe place to stop your vehicle where you can manually check your tyre pressures against the vehicle manufacturers’ recommended settings. These details can be found in your vehicle handbook, inside the fuel filler flap or on a placard located on the driver’s door sill.

If you are unable to check your pressures yourself, either call for roadside assistance or locate your nearest tyre professional who will be able to help you.

TPMS and the Law

Since November 2014, all new passenger vehicles sold in the EU must be equipped with a tyre pressure monitoring system (TPMS)

TPMS has been fitted to cars for many years but recently the mandatory fitment and maintenance of such systems has come into force. The process began with the introduction of legislation on 1 November 2012, whereby all new models of cars sold in the EU had to have a TPMS fitted. This was broadened out in November 2014 to include every new passenger vehicle being required to have a TPMS before being sold. In the UK on 1 January 2015, legislation came into force stating that for these vehicles, an inoperative or faulty TPMS sensor would result in an MOT failure.